I go down to the shore in the morning
and depending on the hour the waves
are rolling in or moving out,
and I say, oh, I am miserable,
what shall—
what should I do? And the sea says
in its lovely voice:
Excuse me, I have work to do.

Mary Oliver, from the book A Thousand Mornings

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

gallifrey-feels:

More fun facts about ancient Celtic marriage laws: There were no laws against interclass or interracial marriage, no laws against open homosexual relationships (although they weren’t considered ‘marriages’ since the definition of a marriage was ‘couple with child’), no requirement for women to take their husband’s names or give up their property, but comedians couldn’t get married

It’s Adam and Eve not Adam Sandler and Eve

(via lgbtlaughs)

neutroisenjolras:

if you ever try to befriend me and you expect to be in frequent contact with me i am so sorry. i do that with maybe two people and even then i often go days or weeks withouts saying anything before talking daily for a while. 

the point is if we dont talk that doesnt mean i dont like u and think about u a lot im just terrible at maintaining close relationships

(via ahypnicjerk)

When people say ‘This is my baby,’ they don’t always mean a baby. Sometimes they mean a dog.

A Somali student, on what has surprised her most about the United States.

(via tastefullyoffensive)

rowling:

dakotaaaa:

My 9 year old brother started reading Harry Potter, and he asked me, so earnestly, “Were the Dursley’s mean to Harry when he was little?” I hadn’t thought much about it before, and he seemed so upset that I totally lied to that little kid. “NO! Of course they weren’t.” 
But then I couldn’t get young Harry out of my head. There must have been a time before he was resigned to their neglect that he wanted their affection.

There will never be a time when I am not absolutely broken up over this.

rowling:

dakotaaaa:

My 9 year old brother started reading Harry Potter, and he asked me, so earnestly, “Were the Dursley’s mean to Harry when he was little?” I hadn’t thought much about it before, and he seemed so upset that I totally lied to that little kid. “NO! Of course they weren’t.” 

But then I couldn’t get young Harry out of my head. There must have been a time before he was resigned to their neglect that he wanted their affection.

There will never be a time when I am not absolutely broken up over this.

(via ahypnicjerk)

panicacidide:

Apparently it’s not socially acceptable for a man to invite another man out just for coffee or to go out for a meal, in case it’s perceived as a date. Like it’s fine if you wanna go to the pub and drink beer and have a chat but make it non-alcoholic and suddenly you’re not straight anymore? You can go to the cinema together but ONLY if it’s an action movie. You guys can’t even just go shopping with each other. Oh masculinity, so fragile, so strange. 

(via lgbtlaughs)

explore-blog:

In Emily Spivack’s altogether fantastic storytelling project Worn Stories, Piper Kerman writes about the vintage suit she wore at her final court appearance and sentencing, a key moment in her memoir-turned-TV-hit Orange Is the New Black:

As your case wends through the system, you barely speak in court; the prosecutor and defense attorney do most of the talking. Unlike 80 percent of criminal defendants, I could afford to hire a lawyer, and I was lucky that he was a very good and experienced one. He had advocated long and hard with the prosecutor on my behalf, and then the day came where his work and my case would be decided by the judge, a Reagan appointee to the federal bench.
Most criminal defendants wear whatever they are given by their attorney or family to their sentencing ; a lot of people are too poor to afford bail, and so they have been wearing jailhouse orange for many months before ever getting their day in court. I was much more fortunate; when I flew to Chicago to be sentenced to prison, I had three choices of court attire in my suitcase. A cadet-blue pantsuit, a very severe navy coatdress, and a wild card I had packed at the last minute: a vintage fifties pencil-skirt suit I had bought on eBay, in a coffee and cream tweed with a subtle sky blue check. It looked like something a Hitchcock heroine would have worn.
“That’s the one,” said my lawyer, pointing to the skirt suit. “We want the judge to be reminded of his own daughter or niece or neighbor when he looks at you.”
For someone standing for judgment, the importance of being seen as a complete human being, someone who is more than just the contents of the file folders that rest on the bench in front of His or Her Honor, cannot be overstated.

More fantastic wearable memoirs curated by Spivack here.

explore-blog:

In Emily Spivack’s altogether fantastic storytelling project Worn Stories, Piper Kerman writes about the vintage suit she wore at her final court appearance and sentencing, a key moment in her memoir-turned-TV-hit Orange Is the New Black:

As your case wends through the system, you barely speak in court; the prosecutor and defense attorney do most of the talking. Unlike 80 percent of criminal defendants, I could afford to hire a lawyer, and I was lucky that he was a very good and experienced one. He had advocated long and hard with the prosecutor on my behalf, and then the day came where his work and my case would be decided by the judge, a Reagan appointee to the federal bench.

Most criminal defendants wear whatever they are given by their attorney or family to their sentencing ; a lot of people are too poor to afford bail, and so they have been wearing jailhouse orange for many months before ever getting their day in court. I was much more fortunate; when I flew to Chicago to be sentenced to prison, I had three choices of court attire in my suitcase. A cadet-blue pantsuit, a very severe navy coatdress, and a wild card I had packed at the last minute: a vintage fifties pencil-skirt suit I had bought on eBay, in a coffee and cream tweed with a subtle sky blue check. It looked like something a Hitchcock heroine would have worn.

“That’s the one,” said my lawyer, pointing to the skirt suit. “We want the judge to be reminded of his own daughter or niece or neighbor when he looks at you.”

For someone standing for judgment, the importance of being seen as a complete human being, someone who is more than just the contents of the file folders that rest on the bench in front of His or Her Honor, cannot be overstated.

More fantastic wearable memoirs curated by Spivack here.